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FAQ - Laptop Adapters

General frequently asked questions about laptop adapters.

1. Before you buy any AC/DC laptop adapter, please make sure the AC/DC laptop adapter will give you the correct voltage and suitable current output.

To find out the voltage & current, turn your laptop over and look for a label, sticker or writing which shows the voltage and current, it should look something like the examples below. The voltage figure will have a "V" after the number i.e 19V and the current will have a "A" or "mA". i.e 3.15A, 950mA. You can also find these shown in a similar fashion on the original AC adapter if you have it. In the examples below the voltage & current has been marked with a red ring.

AC/DC Adapter Calculator
Enter the voltage and current then click calculate for the wattage
Enter Voltage V
Enter Current A

Adapter Wattage Required =


PLEASE NOTE: If the wattage requirement for your laptop is lower than the 60W or 90W output of the adapter, it will not damage your laptop, your laptop will only take the amount of power it requires. I.E. If your laptop needs 45W, then either the 60W or 90W will work OK. If your laptop needs 80W then you will need the 90W one as the 75W one will not be powerful enough.
Only if you were to plug a 19V adapter into a 15V laptop would you run the risk of damage. If in doubt please email us on our contacts page.

2. Information for AC laptop adapter. 
AC Power Adapter can provide continuous power to your laptop/notebook computer and charge the laptop battery from AC power source such as electrical plugs on the wall. If you are looking for a power adapter which can power your laptop and charge the laptop battery from Car, you need looking for our Car (Auto) DC power adapter.

3. Information for Car (Auto) DC laptop adapter. 
Our Car (Auto) DC Power Adapter is the compact, portable power solution for mobile users on the road, the DC power adapter can be used on vehicles with standard cigarette lighters (such as cars and boats) to provide continuous power to your laptop/notebook computers and recharge your batteries.

4. What is Alternating Current? 
In electricity, alternating current (AC) occurs when charge carriers in a conductor or semiconductor periodically reverse their direction of movement. Household utility current in most countries is AC with a frequency of 60 hertz (60 complete cycles per second), although in some countries it is 50 Hz. The radio-frequency (RF) current in antennas and transmission lines is another example of AC.

More information on Alternating Current (AC):

An AC waveform can be sinusoidal, square, or sawtooth-shaped. Some AC waveforms are irregular or complicated. An example of sine-wave AC is common household utility current (in the ideal case). Square or sawtooth waves are produced by certain types of electronic oscillators, and by a low-end uninterruptible power supply (UPS) when it is operating from its battery. Irregular AC waves are produced by audio amplifiers that deal with analog voice signals and/or music.

The voltage of an AC power source can be easily changed by means of a power transformer. This allows the voltage to be stepped up (increased) for transmission and distribution. High-voltage transmission is more efficient than low-voltage transmission over long distances, because the loss caused by conductor resistance decreases as the voltage increases.

The voltage of an AC power source changes from instant to instant in time. The effective voltage of an AC utility power source is usually considered to be the DC voltage that would produce the same power dissipation as heat assuming a pure resistance. The effective voltage for a sine wave is not the same as the peak voltage. To obtain effective voltage from peak voltage, multiply by 0.707. To obtain peak voltage from effective voltage, multiply by 1.414.

5. What is Direct Current? 
DC (Direct current) is the unidirectional flow or movement of electric charge carriers, usually electron. The intensity of the current can vary with time, but the general direction of movement stays the same at all times. As an adjective, the term DC is used in reference to voltage whose polarity never reverses.

In a DC circuit, electrons emerge from the negative, or minus, pole and move towards the positive, or plus, pole. Nevertheless, physicists define DC as traveling from plus to minus.

More information on Direct Current (DC):

Direct current is produced by electrochemical and photovoltaic cells and batteries. In contrast, the electricity available from utility mains in most countries is AC (alternating current). Utility AC can be converted to DC by means of a power supply consisting of a transformer, a rectifier (which prevents the flow of current from reversing), and a filter (which eliminates current pulsations in the output of the rectifier).

Virtually all electronic, digital device and computer hardware needs DC to function. Most solid-state equipment requires between 1.5 and 13.5 volts. Current demands can range from practically zero for an electronic wristwatch to more than 100 amperes for a radio communications power amplifier. Equipment using vacuum tubes, such as a high-power radio or television broadcast transmitter or a CRT (cathode-ray tube) display, require from about 150 volts to several thousand volts DC.

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